Conversion Rates- Evaluation: Simple and Sticky – Part 2

Yes; we’re still talking about how to keep things simple for Heidi and how to make her ‘stick’ to you like those loyal customers we all want. Let’s carry on from where we left off last time. Let’s talk about generating Trust. Yes; we’re still talking about how to keep things simple for Heidi and how to make her ‘stick’ to you like those loyal customers we all want. Let’s carry on from where we left off last time. Let’s talk about generating Trust.

 

Trust

 

Trust is not so much about trusting your brand, it’s about how well Heidi can trust the information you provide. That’s one of the reasons Happy Heidi will listen more to her friends than to you, because she knows how much weight she can put on their opinions and experience. If you are displaying customer reviews on your website or social media page, then you need to go a step ahead. Provide the adviser’s decision criteria and their use of the product or service. So encourage a group of trustworthy advisors, which will take you a step ahead of general recommenders.

 

Weighing up the Options

 

This is the final step in the evaluation process. Heidi will really, REALLY appreciate you making this step as simple as possible for her.

 

Rule 1 – Too many choices to evaluate does not make a Happy Heidi.

 

Don’t overwhelm her with choice. Too many choices mean you will be making fewer sales. Remember the famous study on jam offerings? To refresh your memory: There were two tables in a supermarket, each with the identical brand of jam displayed at different times. One table offered 6 varieties, and the other 24. The total sales from the table with 6 options was 30% of passersby, while the conversion rate on the table of 24 options converted only 3%! With both tables, the average number of jams sampled per person was 2. In another study on the effects of choice, students who were about to solve word puzzles were offered a cup of tea beforehand. Those who were offered a choice—between caffeine or relaxing camomile—solved less puzzles than those who were directed to one tea only.

 

Rule 2 – Keep your choices to 6 or less in any comparison.

 

If you have 100 offerings, break them down into bite-size categories. I remember doing this with a client in my home town who had over 40 offering descriptions crammed onto the back of an A5 sheet. But by categorising them into 6 groups (with bold headings), prospective customers weren’t overwhelmed—and sales increased.

 

Rule 3 – Never, ever just offer one item.

 

Having at least two choices helps to switch the decision from “Should I buy?“ to “Which one should I buy?“

 

Rule 4 – Keep your information relevant.

 

A florist company in South America increased their sales by 27% by adding a clock image and a countdown. The clock told how many hours were left of the same-day delivery guarantee they were offering. Not only did this give re-assurance about the importance the supplier put on meeting emotionally critical events, but it also added a sense of urgency to the purchase decision.

 

Some Sample Websites

 

Use google to research some of these good and not-so-good examples of how business is meeting customer evaluation needs.

 

– J.C. Penney

 

– Intuit Turbo Tax

 

– De Beers- the “4C’s”– cut, colour, clarity and carats

 

– ShoeDazzle.com

 

– Crest toothpaste – too many choices not helpfully categorised

 

To paraphrase Elvis and Lionel Ritchie, you want Heidi “stuck on you.” By keeping the evaluation steps simple, you keep Heidi happy and ‘sticky’ in the best possible way.

 

Graeme Stevens
CEO and Co-Founder
neXtep easy
www.nextepeasy.com

 

neXtep Business Builder Community Pte Ltd
Singapore ACRA Business Registration Number: 201424522Z
80 Kitchener Road #09-09/10 Singapore 208539